• Levels 1A and 1B are built around the same key themes: international economic relations, labour and the workplace, social order and conflict, gender and the family, leisure and consumption, migration and community; in the same regions: Britain, Western Europe, the USA and Japan. However, they are designed as stand-alone courses.
  • This course explores the causes and consequences of industrialisation from the mid-eighteenth century to the First World War. Starting with the pre-industrial economy and society, we trace the development of manufacturing and trade, labour organisation, the growth of cities, commercial leisure and the relationship between the sexes. The changes in all these areas are tracked from Britain, to Europe, and then the wider world. National histories are placed in an international perspective and rapid transitions against the background of long-term trends. In this way, students will be able to understand the experience of their own society and economy more fully and will be introduced to major themes in history such as sources of economic growth, sources of social change, and the international transmission of social and economic trends.
  • This course explores the causes and consequences of industrialisation from the mid-eighteenth century to the First World War. Starting with the pre-industrial economy and society, we trace the development of manufacturing and trade, labour organisation, the growth of cities, commercial leisure and the relationship between the sexes. The changes in all these areas are tracked from Britain, to Europe, and then the wider world. National histories are placed in an international perspective and rapid transitions against the background of long-term trends. In this way, students will be able to understand the experience of their own society and economy more fully and will be introduced to major themes in history such as sources of economic growth, sources of social change, and the international transmission of social and economic trends.
  • This course charts the emergence of a global economy and society from around 1750 through to the First World War. After looking at pre-industrial economy and society, the course explores the development of a recognisably modern world through the nineteenth century, not only in terms of manufacturing and trade, but also the growth of cities, financial institutions, labour organisation, leisure activities and family relationships. The changes in all these areas are tracked from Britain, 'the cradle of the industrial revolution', to Europe, and then the wider world. National histories are placed in an international perspective and rapid transitions against the background of long-term trends.

    Students will be introduced to major questions in history such as the conditions for economic growth, the relationship between economic and social change, and the global transmission of both stability and instability. They will also be introduced to primary sources, which are the basis for all historical knowledge, and be taught critical analysis of secondary literature. The course also aims to foster skills in academic writing and debate as well as group working and oral presentations.

    Levels 1A and 1B are built around the same key themes: international economic relations, labour and the workplace, social order and conflict, gender and the family, leisure and consumption, migration and community; in Britain, Europe, the USA and Japan, with some coverage of other regions. The course content, skills tutorials and assessment allow for progression. However, they can also be taken as stand-alone courses.

  • Levels 1B is built around the key themes of: international economic relations, labour and the workplace, social order and conflict, gender and the family, leisure and consumption, migration and community; in Britain, Western Europe, the USA and Japan; since 1914.
  • This course explores the global impact of economic phenomenon and social change in the advanced economies from the First World War to the present day. It introduces students to major themes including the causes of economic growth and recession, the sources of social change, and the impact of war on society and the economy in an international framework. The course charts the crises of the inter-war period: the Great Depression, mass unemployment, and the rise of fascism and communism, as well as the development of mass leisure and the growth of a consumer society. The course also explores the prolonged boom following the Second World War, a time of conspicuous consumption but also of commitment to social welfare, both of which fuelled the sexual revolution and youth culture across national borders. The course then explores the impact of globalisation following the oil crisis of 1973 and subsequent instability, and looks at developing nations and environmental concerns in the later decades of the 20th century. 

    The emphasis on contemporary and international history enables students to understand the experience of their own society and economy more fully in the light of global and long-term trends. They will also be introduced to primary sources which are the basis for all historical knowledge.

    Levels 1A and 1B are built around the same key themes: international economic relations, labour and the workplace, social order and conflict, gender and the family, leisure and consumption, migration and community; in Britain, Europe, the USA and Japan with some attention to other regions. The course content, skills tutorials and assessment allow for progression. However, they can also be taken as stand-alone courses.